Topic of the week – is the paper dead?

 

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Airgead 3 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #2193

    Airgead
    Participant

    Hi Guys

    The scheme you were discribing for doing science in a collaborative way where people can add to an existing body of knowledge by forking and adding revisions to the current state of knowledge sounds exactly like the way software teams, particularly open source communities handle distributed version control.

    If you ant a system for doing exactly what you were talking about, may I suggest you have a look at git and gitflow. They are systems for managing distributed revisions to a common set of documents (usually code but doesn;t have to be). You can write books this way (through places like leanpub). You can write code this way (naturally). You can even do science this way. I believe there are already some open source science projects using things like git to manage their work.

    The open source malaria program is one that springs to mind. I’m not sure whether they use git but if not they would use something very similar.

    P.S.Does anyone ever read this forum any more. My hilariously witty comments about brewing have been let go through to the keeper.

    Cheers
    Dave

    #2194
    stapleton.aj
    stapleton.aj
    Keymaster

    Dave!

    Thanks for letting us know! Yes, we still read this forum and your comments were read out on the last recording of the podcast to come out in two weeks time!

    We should look into the projects that use git like forking…

    Keep commenting!

    #2195

    Airgead
    Participant

    Ha! Good to hear.

    I love the idea of an open source model for science. We can do much better than peer reviewed papers these dates. Let’s face it, that’s a model that was developed in the 1800s. Technology has moved on a little since then.

    The big stumbling block isn’t the technology. Distributed version control has been around since the 90s. That’s a solved problem (no blockchain required unless you need to apply for funding in which case drop the word blockchain a few times in your pitch and millions will pour in your direction). It’s the measurements. How do you fit open collaboration into a measurement model that relies on h indexes and number of papers written to judge success? Measurement drives behaviour.

    Full disclosure here.. I’m not a scientist (I’m a business and leadership coach as my day job). I just look at science from the outside (face pressed up against the window, looking at all the shiny things inside, wishing I had studied harder at school so I could be inside with you guys).

    Cheers
    Dave

    #2203

    Airgead
    Participant

    Hey folks. Should respond to the question you asked – how does a business coach end up knowing stuff about science?

    Well… My Dad was a scientist. He had a PHd in food science and was one of Australia’s leading food scientists. He was chief scientist for cottees for many years. Worked at the CSIRO (before it was the CSIRO) of and did a bunch of other cool stuff before becoming a manager or food companies. So science was always in the family.

    I didn’t end up a scientist, I went into engineering instead (because I wanted an actual secure job) but keep up a keen interest. New Scientist is my breakfast reading. I own brief history of time (like millions) and and have actually read it (unlike millions). I keep up to date with Australian science through things like Australian Science Channel (which is where I found you jokers).

    These days I teach leaders how to lead using essentially the scientific method – hypothesis testing, emperical, data driven decision making. I don’t call it scientific management because that’s why they used to call the old 50s style time and motion studies which everyone hates.

    I also teach conflict management and act as neutral facilitator for a lot conflict so your science this on arguments interested me greatly. That’s a lot of what I do. I hate to say this but bulk T-bag (catering pack) was nearly right – one of the biggest jobs of the facilitator is to find, not so much the topic, but the common purpose – something the parties can agree on and move from there. There is a lot of science (well psychology which is close) in that as well.

    BTW-I can work with universities, so if your institutions have disfuctional management and lots of conflict, get your vice chancellor to give me a call.

    Cheers
    dave

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